Principles of Economics-E2

Numbering Code U-LAS06 10013 LE43 Year/Term 2021 ・ Second semester
Number of Credits 2 Course Type Lecture
Target Year Mainly 1st year students Target Student For all majors
Language English Day/Period Wed.1
Instructor name NEWTON, Jonathan Charles Scott (Institute of Economic Research Professor)
Outline and Purpose of the Course This course is an exploration of key economic principles, illustrated and discussed via examples, both quantitative and qualitative. The purpose of the course is to give students a deep and thoughtful understanding of economic concepts.

IMPORTANT: This course is best suited to students who enjoy mathematics and the kind of logical arguments associated with mathematics. A reasonable understanding of basic concepts (calculus, continuity, convexity, concavity, vectors, limits) will be assumed. Students who are less confident with such concepts will probably be more comfortable with the course "Introduction to Economics".
Course Goals ~ To further understanding of important economic concepts.
~ To understand how such concepts can be rigorously modeled.
~ To be able to consider and apply these concepts in a modern context.
Schedule and Contents Each week we will consider an interesting economic concept. The course will cover some or all of the following topics, each of which will be covered in 2 time blocks (an estimated 3 hours of class time):

1. General equilibrium in competitive markets.
2. Markets and morals.
3. From the jungle to design economics.
4. Marxism, socialism and the resilience of markets.
5. Inequality.
6. Kantian cooperation.
7. Unintended consequences of policy interventions.

Total: Approximately 14 classes, 1 Feedback session (i.e. 15 lectures per semester, excluding examinations). The course yields two credits.
Evaluation Methods and Policy Grading (100%) will be based on assignments to be completed either in class or outside of class.
Course Requirements Students are required to have sufficient competency in English and logical thinking to read the textbook, attend class and complete assigned questions.

This course is best suited to students who enjoy mathematics and the kind of logical arguments associated with mathematics. A reasonable understanding of basic concepts (calculus, continuity, convexity, concavity, vectors, limits) will be assumed. Students who are less confident with such concepts will probably be more comfortable with the course "Introduction to Economics".
Study outside of Class (preparation and review) Readings assigned in class should be read each week. Assignments should be completed.
Textbooks Textbooks/References Lectures on Microeconomics: The Big Questions Approach, Romans Pancs, (MIT Press), ISBN: 978-0262038188, Essential textbook for the course.
PAGE TOP