5231002History of Western Philosophy (Special Lectures)

Numbering Code G-LET02 65231 LJ34 Year/Term 2021 ・ Intensive, First semester
Number of Credits 2 Course Type special lecture
Target Year Target Student
Language Japanese Day/Period Intensive
Instructor name iwata naoya (Part-time Lecturer)
Outline and Purpose of the Course The technique called "analysis" has continued to be one of the most important methods used in philosophy, considering the history of Western philosophy from ancient times to the present day. However, its origins can be traced back to the technique of discovering the premise of a proposition and constructing a proof for it, which was used in ancient Greek geometry. Plato was the first philosopher to apply this geometrical analysis method to his own philosophical investigations.

In this course, we will start with a summary of how the method of "analysis" has been used from ancient to early modern times, before the rise of modern analytical philosophy. We will then examine the origins of both of the two main specified analysis concepts ("regressive analysis" and "decompositional analysis") in Plato's receptance of geometrical analysis methods. Arriving at this point, we will focus on the relationship between Plato's "provisional method" (regressive) in his middle-period dialogues, and his "synthesis and partitioning method" (decompositional). From here, we will aim to provide a comprehensive view of Plato's above two philosophical methods, and a clear understanding of philosophical trends in the early days of analytical methods and the concept of analysis.

This course will include discussions based on reading and understanding primary texts (translations accepted), so students are expected to participate actively.
Course Goals ・To understand how analysis techniques have been used in the history of Western philosophy.
・To comprehensively understand Plato's different philosophical methods from the perspective of analysis methods.
・To be able to think critically about the possibility of different interpretations based on reading and understanding primary texts.
Schedule and Contents Day 1: Summary of analysis methods from ancient to modern times
 1. Explanation by the professor
 2. Student discussions
 3. Summary of discussions

Day 2: Provisional methods in "Meno" and "Phaedon"
 4. Explanation by the professor
 5. Student discussions
 6. Summary of discussions

Day 3: Pursuit of the definition of "good" and provisional methods in Plato's "Republic"
 7. Explanation by the professor
 8. Student discussions
 9. Summary of discussions

Day 4: Paradox in search of a definition, and recollection theories
 10. Explanation by the professor
 11. Student discussions
 12. Summary of discussions

Day 5: Synthesis and decompositional methods
 13. Explanation by the professor
 14. Student discussions
 15. Summary of discussions
Evaluation Methods and Policy Students will be assessed comprehensively, on the total of their reaction papers on each topic (one topic per day) (20%), their level of contributions to class discussions (20%), and on their final report (60%).
Course Requirements None
Study outside of Class (preparation and review) The professor will hand out reaction paper topics and a list of reference works ahead of time, so please work on these before the intensive course begins.

As a review, summarize the explanations and discussion content from that day, and use this to complete the report assignment.
Textbooks Textbooks/References Not used
References, etc. Other; the following two texts can provide an understanding of this course.

Beaney, Michael, "Analysis", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2018 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2018/entries/analysis/>.

Benson, H. H., (2015), Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic, Oxford University Press, New York.

A more detailed reference list will be distributed in class.
Related URL Other; to get a complete picture of this lecture course, the following two texts are best.

Beaney, Michael, "Analysis", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2018 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2018/entries/analysis/>.

Benson, H. H., (2015), Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic, Oxford University Press, New York.

A more detailed reference list will be distributed in class.
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