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279 - The Effects of Medications – How Big Data is Revolutionising Our Understanding, 2018

The Effects of Medications - How Big Data is Revolutionising Our Understanding

The Effects of Medications - How Big Data is Revolutionising Our Understanding

Professor Ian Douglas
Assistant Professor Masao Iwagami

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University of Tsukuba

March 20 & 22, 2018

Lecture Videos

Course Description

Kyoto University School of Public Health (KUSPH) invites you to the FY2018 special lecture series on “The Effects of Medications – how Big Data is Revolutionising Our Understanding” Professor Ian Douglas, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). As a pharmacoepidemiolgist, he has spent several years at the UK Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency and in the pharmaceutical industry investigating adverse effects of drugs, both in clinical trials and post-marketing. He is interested, in particular, how we can use large linked electronic healthcare record databases to investigate the effects of drugs, both harmful and beneficial. He is exploring methodologies to minimise some of the biases inherent in the research of drug effects, and his main current areas of interest are case-only approaches to study design and how we can determine whether routine care data can be used to estimate the intended effects of medications.

This course will involve a mixture of lectures and discussion groups where participants will get chance to apply there learning to both real and hypothetical research questions in pharmacoepidemiology.

Some sessions will also be delivered by Masao Iwagami, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Research, University of Tsukuba, and Honorary Assistant Professor in the Electronic Health Records Research Group, LSHTM. He is experienced in conducting medical research using large databases of routinely collected data, such as UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) Database, Tokushukai Medical Database, and Medical Data Vision (MDV) Database.